Welcome to our DogBlog!

Featured

Share
Our dog family

Murry and Julie Walton with Maggie and Blue Belle.

Welcome to our DogBlog: A Dog’s Eye View, written by Boise, Idaho website designer, Julie Walton; her hubby, Murry; and their best friend and dog blogger, Maggie. (Note – sorry to report Maggie died October, 2012.  We are happy to introduce you to to the newest member of our family, an adopted rescue Aussie/Heeler named Blue Belle.)  She is the Rescue Dog that rescued us.

Our goal in creating this blog is to inform and educate our friends about dogs and the resources we have here in the beautiful Northwest, and to include some good clean fun!

If you have a suggestion, or idea, please feel free to comment or send an email. See the Comment Bubble at the top of each post. Thanks for your interest.

“The reason a dog has so many friends is that he wags his tail instead of his tongue.” ~Author Unknown

5 Fun Outdoor Activities with Your Dog

Share

Guest Blog Contributor – David, Stand Up Paddle Boards Review

Dog having fun in water

Photo by Peter Hershey on Unsplash

Regardless of how much time you spend with your dog, it will never be enough; it is called man’s best friend for a reason. Also, even more than people, dogs need to work out regularly especially after spending a lot of time gaining extra pounds indoors during winter.

A regular walk would do but spicing things up for both of you is far much better, don’t you think? In this article, you will learn fantastic outdoor activities that you can do with your dog and make memories that you will both keep forever. (Well, the dog might not remember, but that is not the point here).

  1. Go to a Dog Park

If your dog is active and playful, there is no better place to take him than to the local dog park. He will have all the space he needs to run around. In addition to exercising, your dog will interact with other dogs and make dog friends. It is said that dog parks can alleviate behavior problems and reduce the number of pets surrendered to shelters.

As a good dog owner, be responsible in the park; at the very least, make sure your dog understands necessary commands like sit, come and stay and clean after him. Take these points into consideration;

  • Your dog should be healthy, current on vaccinations and have all necessary licenses.
  • You should not bring more dogs than you can handle.
  • Do not let your dog involve himself in inappropriate behaviors like jumping on people, bullying, aggressive playing or extreme barking.
  • If another dog makes you or your dog uncomfortable, just leave.
  • Do not take a female dog in heat to the park. An intact male should be social and non-aggressive.

Continue reading

Shock collars for territorial dogs?

Share

Guest Blog Contributor – Christy of Doglifestore.com

Dog breeds can be categorized according to their function, size, and shape and throughout the years, over 300 dog breeds have been listed down. Apart from a few working dog breeds, statistics have actually shown that dog breeds have only emerged over the last hundred years. The reason why this happened is because dogs were bred in order to get a desired result such as getting the wanted size, shape, physical abilities and many others and this encompasses the physical appearance but also their temperaments. Dogs like the German Shepherds, Rottweiler, Doberman Pinschers and many others were bred because of their hunting capabilities and also their general temperament that makes them great guard dogs.

The aforementioned dogs are also coincidentally the breeds that many insurance companies have considered to be blacklisted because of the risks that they entail. Certainly this logic is not unfounded but reputation that these dogs have garnered that they are terrifying aggressive have colored people’s perception on them and more often than not, in a very unhealthy way.

Indeed, the way these types of dogs were bred have a certain genetic inclination to become more territorial thus showing more aggressive behaviors but the way they are brought up should also be taken into consideration. Despite their reputation, the aforementioned dogs along with others such as the Akita, Great Danes, Alaskan Malamutes, Siberian Huskies and others are great companions and family dogs.

With that in mind, would using a shock collar for inherently territorial dogs be ideal?

Before they had the more sophisticated version that we now know today, shock collars have actually been around since the 1960’s and used to train hunting dogs. They were used to deter unwanted behavior such as excessive barking and also training dogs to stay within properly lines, most especially in farm areas.

Over the years, the shock collar or sometimes called the e-collar has created a great divide among pet parents and also experts. The negative view on collars stems from the idea these are “torture” devices designed to cause pain and at some point submit your dog to obedience. People who are against the usage of the device prefer non-chock methods.

On the other hand, people who approve of the shock collar, may it be experts and regular pet owners believe that it is a great tool for training. Even the famous dog whisperer, Cesar Millan, has approved the use of the collar.

On a more personal note, the results of using the shock collar is fairly evident. Granted that it is used properly, it is a great training tool. But, if a pet owner does not know how to use the device, it will bring unwanted consequences for your dog. Overall, it depends on how it is utilized and if it’s utilized in the right way. Continue reading

3 Vinegar-Based, Pet-Friendly Garden Maintenance Alternatives

Share

Contribution from freelance writer Sally Writes

Fountain

Photo by John Wilson on Unsplash

It’s important to have an outdoor space that everyone can enjoy, from you right down to Fido. Everyone loves to relax or play in a well-maintained yard or garden. However, there are many products that are regularly used for routine lawn and garden maintenance that are toxic to pets. 55, 516 pets are affected by toxic substances each year; the most common sources of poisoning are cosmetic and cleaning products. To prevent accidents and make sure that everyone enjoys the outdoors safely this fall, here are some cleaning alternatives that are healthy and safe for the environment and your pet.

Fountains

Many people choose to spruce up their garden with a feature piece such as a fountain. It’s a great, easy way to add value and charm to an outdoor space. To keep up the value and allure, regular maintenance is a must. Many sources recommend cleaning fountains with a mild soap or dish detergent. While this may yield cleanliness as a result, it can be potentially harmful to the water table and your dog, if ingested. A better, more eco and pet safe method for cleaning your outdoor fountain, is to use one cup of white vinegar per one gallon distilled water. The vinegar will help break down mineral and algae deposits, while distilled water will help prevent minerals from building up in the first place. Additionally, your dog won’t come to any harm if he decided that the water looks drinkably good.

Birdbaths   

Continue reading

Why Rescue an Older Dog?

Share

When I was contacted by this guest blogger and given some suggestions for blog post article titles, my heart was touched and I thought of our dog, Scout, who lived into her mid teens.  She was such a loyal dog.  What if for some reason we were not able to care for her any longer and she needed to be adopted.  I would hope that some caring person would adopt our precious Scout, even though she was a senior. I agree with you, John.  These wonderful older dogs deserve a loving home to enjoy their twilight years.


Guest Blogger: John Devlin
Owner – Dogsbarn.com
Husband, father and avid dog lover. Currently the proud owner of George a pedigree Golden Retriever who barely leaves my side. However cute this sounds a little break from the dog hairs every now and then would be nice!

Why Rescue an Older Dog?

Source:Pixabay.com

Is there anything cuter than puppies? Probably not, which is why they never stay at shelters long. However, while you are walking towards the puppy section at your local rescue center, spare a thought for the oldies languishing in their kennels.

Many are there through no fault of their own, perhaps their owner has passed away or can no longer care for them, maybe there is a new baby in the family or their owner has moved somewhere that doesn’t allow dogs or has developed allergies. Whatever the reason, imagine the confusion they feel having spent years in a loving home and when they should be enjoying their twilight years suddenly they find themselves desperate for a second chance.

The sad fact is; Senior dogs are often overlooked and can wait up to four times longer for a home than their younger counterparts resulting in many being euthanized. So, if you are considering adopting a dog it’s worth thinking about the benefits of adopting a golden oldie.

Continue reading

This Is Why You Need a Therapy Dog If You Have a Mental Disorder

Share

Guest Post By: Paige Johnson
LearnFit.org

Most of us are familiar with service dogs that help people with physical impairments such as blindness or paralysis. We see them assist with crossing the street, opening doors, and performing other tasks that make their owners’ lives more manageable. Now, studies show that dogs are effective at treating depression and anxiety and improving people’s overall health. If you have a mental disorder, you need to consider getting a therapy dog. We’ll show you why below.

Dogs help peopleTherapy Dogs Help People with Mental Disorders Navigate Social Situations

People who have depression and anxiety often avoid social situations because they worry about what may happen when they are around too many people or strangers. They often have negative thoughts and fears. As Pet Wellness Academy co-founder Dr. Katie Kangas explains: “Anxiety and depression involve emotional turmoil and negative internal ‘self-talk.’ These thoughts typically spiral into unrealistic negativity and this continues in a vicious cycle.”

Dogs, whether they are pets or trained therapy animals, provide comfort and companionship for people with mental disorders by providing them with a reason for leaving the house and being in social situations. For example, your dog requires exercise such as a daily walk. Having a dog by your side can help you stay calm and provide comfort because you have a friend with you in situations that make you uncomfortable.

Trained dogs also can recognize the signs of a panic attack and calm their owners when one begins. Some trained dogs nudge their owner’s hand or leg or lick them to provide a stimulus to distract or calm them. They also know how to block strangers from approaching their owners and help them remain calm when they are among too many unfamiliar people.

Therapy dogs also help people navigate social situations by providing a starting point for conversations. When you walk your dog, for example, people may ask about your dog or try to pet him, prompting you to explain that your dog is working and how he helps you navigate day-to-day life. The dog acts as an icebreaker for conversations that otherwise may be difficult or uncomfortable for a person with a mental disorder. Plus, dogs are nonjudgmental and can provide a great listening ear for you when you’re struggling with difficult situations. Continue reading

How an Emotional Support Dog Can Help You Get Through a Tough Day

Share

Guest Post by: Brad Smith, TherapyPet.org

If you have a dog as an emotional support pet, you already know how much affection and fun they bring. However, did you know that dogs also offer powerful physical and mental health benefits? They can greatly minimize anxiety, stress, feelings of loneliness and depression, along with encouraging playfulness and exercise, and even strengthening your cardiovascular health. During the days when you are feeling down, an emotional support dog can help you in the following ways:

Acceptance and Unconditional Love

As much as we know, dogs don’t have prejudices, opinions and critiques. Even if you are reeking of alcohol after a bad day, they will be more than willing to cuddle with you. If your relationship with your friends or family is frayed and complicated, and you don’t really have no one to come home to and vent, your dog will be ever-present as the best antidote to your sadness and stress. They will not judge, nor complain and will certainly not give you advice you don’t want.

Distraction from Your Pain and Anguish

Dogs are just as good as books and movies. They take our minds off the worries and into another dimension, one where there’s only playfulness, clowning around, a wet nose and lots of kisses. This type of distraction is the best type since it makes you forget how awful your day went when you have a furry friend breathing in your face all the time.

More Physical Contact

Touching has undisputedly strong healing powers. Studies suggest that 45 minutes of massage can lower stress levels and enhance your immune system by promoting the growth of white blood cells. Hugging produces a hormone that lowers blood pressure, stress levels and heart rates. The touch of another human or animal can stop certain parts of the brain from reacting to threat clues. Thus, it is not surprising how handling a dog, i.e stroking and cuddling it, can regularize heart rates and lower blood pressure while boosting dopamine and serotonin levels.

Increased Levels of Activity

After a tough day, the last thing you probably want to do is be active. Slouching down and binge eating while crying over your miseries can worsen your physical and mental state. However, if you have a friendly support companion waiting for you at home, you are sure to get some physical activity. Dogs need to be walked, fed and followed which will mean extra physical activity on your part.

More Social Interaction

Dogs are natural icebreakers, which mean they subtly push you towards more social interaction. On a tough day, you may decide to walk your dog and find yourself chatting with other dog walkers and befriending them in the process.

Better Health

Research suggests that dog owners experience protection against heart disease, reduced stress hormones, and increased levels of feel-good chemical present in the brain both while and prior to performing stressful mental tasks. A study with Chinese female participants found that owning a dog can help with better sleep, better fitness due to increased exercise and improved overall health resulting in fewer sick days.

Create a Routine

Having a daily routine helps people fight depression by utilizing their time efficiently. An emotional support dog’s natural routine, i.e. walking in the morning, demanding for food and playtime, can help you direct your attention towards the activities instead of sulking about your day.

These are just some of the ways that your emotional support dog can help you get through a bad day without breaking down.