Welcome to our DogBlog!

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Our dog family

Murry and Julie Walton with Maggie and Blue Belle.

Welcome to our DogBlog: A Dog’s Eye View, written by Boise, Idaho website designer, Julie Walton; her hubby, Murry; and their best friend and dog blogger, Maggie. (Note – sorry to report Maggie died October, 2012.  We are happy to introduce you to to the newest member of our family, an adopted rescue Aussie/Heeler named Blue Belle.)  She is the Rescue Dog that rescued us.

Our goal in creating this blog is to inform and educate our friends about dogs and the resources we have here in the beautiful Northwest, and to include some good clean fun!

If you have a suggestion, or idea, please feel free to comment or send an email. See the Comment Bubble at the top of each post. Thanks for your interest.

“The reason a dog has so many friends is that he wags his tail instead of his tongue.” ~Author Unknown

Preparing For a Car Ride With Your Dog

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Guest Post By: Tess Halpren
Community Outreach
The Zebra

Easiest Ways to Pet Proof Your Car

Pet proof before a trip

Most dogs love going for car rides. With their head out the window, ears blowing in the wind, dogs are the picture of bliss when they tag along for the trip.

In reality, though, car rides can be very stressful for even the happiest dogs. Whether going on a cross-country road trip or just down the street, dogs often experience anxiety during a drive. This anxiety is caused by a number of things, including the movement of the car, the sound of the engine, or the possibility of a trip to the vet’s (eek!). If you aren’t careful, you’ll land up with a jittery pup and maybe even a ruined backseat.

The following post from The Zebra gives a collection of tips and tricks for keeping you, your dog, and your car happy on your next road trip. These tips give advice on what to do before, during, and after your car ride to keep your pup calm and your car clean.

Pet proof infographic

Moving Tips for Your Fur Babies – DogBlog

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Guest Post Contributor: Karli Jaenike

In all the excitement of moving some people forget that it can be an incredibly stressful time for your pup. They don’t inherently know what’s going on, and may feel unsure about their place in the move and where they are heading.

To make your dog feel extra secure, there are certain things you can do. For example, before the move, it can be helpful to have some boxes out a few weeks early so that they get used to them. You can also ensure you spend lots of quality time with your furry friend to assure them they are still #1 in your heart.

During the move, remember to keep them safe by either crating them or taking them to a friend or family members house. Ensure they always have their collar and tags on just in case they escape. After the move, it can be helpful to spend a few days around the house with your dog to reassure them that they are safe.

Our friends at at HireAHelper put together a list of tips that dog pawrents can use to keep their pets, happy and calm during a move. You can see it below!

Help Your Pet Adjust to a New Home

Help Your Pet Adjust to a New Home

Tips For Camping Holidays With Your Dog

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Contribution from freelance writer Sally Writes

Camping with your dog

Photo by Jorge Flores on Unsplash

With more dog owners than ever in the US, 77% of people surveyed said their pets will influence their holiday travel plans.  For many, that means pooch comes along too, and why not? What could be more fun than living in the countryside for a week or so with your canine best friend for company?  The walking routes will be just a step away and it will give you a chance to detach from all the hustle and bustle of modern life and fully relax.  However, there’s just a few things to take into consideration to ensure your holiday is problem free and great fun.

Health checklist to prepare your dog

Ensure your dog’s general healthcare is up to date, in particular vaccinations (including for heartworm which is now prevalent in the US) and that your dog has recently been wormed.  If your dog takes any regular medication for ongoing conditions e.g. anti allergy tablets, then ensure you have had a recent review with your vet. Mention you are planning to take your dog on holiday and check your medication stocks are sufficient to cover that period of time.  Also, ensure any veterinary insurance policies are up to date and pack the policy details, contact phone number and your veterinarian’s contact details.  Alongside this paperwork you could also pack any medication supplies at this stage to cover the holiday period. Continue reading

Nipping Dog Food Allergies in the Bud

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Contribution from freelance writer Sally Writes

Dogs have allergies

Photo by Christal Yuen on Unsplash

If you see your dog biting his paws, scratching or obsessively licking, he could have a food allergy – a condition which can take its toll on his digestive system as much as his skin. The very first step to take if you suspect your dog might be allergic to food is to visit your vet. Although dogs only show signs of irritation initially, allergies can cause serious problems and can even be life-threatening. In this post, we discuss the nature of food allergies and offer suggestions to stop them quickly and efficiently. Your dog will still be able to enjoy all his favorite treats, so long as these are allergen-free.

Foods Based Triggers

Like human beings, a plethora of foods can cause dog allergies, though ‘the usual suspects’ are chicken, pork, rabbit, lamb, beef, egg, corn, wheat, soy, and dairy foods. Interestingly, most of these foods are proteins. Your dog could be allergic to one or more ingredient.

In case you wonder how your dog develops a food allergy, the process is as follows: in a healthy dog, any food consumed will be broken down into nutrients and amino acids that pass from the GI tract to the bloodstream. In dogs with leaky gut, however, nutrients which have not been fully broken down make their way into the bloodstream, thus wreaking havoc on the immune system. Food allergies in dogs essentially arise from ‘leaky gut syndrome’,a condition that also affects humans.

Elimination and Experimentation with Novel Proteins

Your vet will usually prescribe a specific diet incorporating just one protein and one carbohydrate – for instance, chicken and rice. Your dog will remain on this simple diet for a couple of months and you can slowly start replacing ingredients, one by one, until you identify an allergen. Some vets recommend sticking to the first combination that works, but eventually your dog could develop an allergy to these two foods as well, so working your way up to a varied diet is a better long-term option.

Dr. Karen Becker of Mercola Pets recommends using new proteins your dog has not consumed before when starting the elimination diet, including “ostrich, beaver, quail, pheasant, rabbit, venison, bison, goat, duck, elk, alligator, and kangaroo.” It is important to feed dogs food from different families than those they are accustomed to, to give the body a chance to detoxify. It is probably best to refrain feeding your dog foods they have been reactive to in the past, since you can undo the good work that the elimination diet has achieved.

To battle common dog food allergies, it is important to create an elimination plan with your vet. You may be recommended a veterinary diet or home-cooked diet designed by a veterinary nutritionist. Remember to keep it basic and be watchful for signs and symptoms of a flare-up. Finally, patience and commitment are key to finding a combination that works for your pooch.

Stay with Me: Helping Your Dog Cope with Separation Anxiety

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Contribution from freelance writer Sally Writes

Dog with separation anxiety

Photo by Andrew Welch on Unsplash

20-40% of all dogs are estimated to experience separation anxiety at some point in their lives (College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign). Separation anxiety is a serious behavioral problem that has a critical impact on pets and their owners. Some signs of anxiety and stress are destructive behavior, self-harm, restlessness, and an inability to eat. While pet owners might see these behaviors as being vindictive, they are not. They are symptoms that your pet is stressed and unhappy when you are away. If you are a pet owner and notice that your dog exhibits certain symptoms of separation anxiety, there are things that you can do to improve care and help cope with stress for an overall wellbeing.

The Causes of Separation Anxiety

Separation anxiety among pets is not well understood. A few existing research studies indicate that dogs that are abandoned and/or abused like rescue animals are likely to feel anxious. Certain breeds of dog are also susceptible to the disorder such as Labrador Retrievers or German Shepherds. Emotional distress is the primary reason for anxiety disorder and manifests when the owner is absent or not around. If you notice that your pooch suddenly starts whining or pacing as soon as you put on your shoes or grab your coat in preparation to leave the house, they might be feeling anxious. What you see when you are back home might even confirm your suspicion that your dog has a separation anxiety issue. Is your sofa chewed in several places? Maybe, you’ll find feces and urine that are more frequent when you are away. Your dog also becomes hyperactive, starts barking, howling and scratching without good reason. These are the typical symptoms of separation anxiety. It makes you both nervous and unhappy which is why you should get help immediately. Continue reading

Top Tips for Protecting Your Dog in Winter Weather

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Guest Blogger: Bernie Boxer

Dog in winter

Image courtesy of Pixabay

Winter brings special challenges to dog owners.  When temperatures drop and freezing weather moves in, you’ll need to take extra measures to ensure your dog is safe and comfortable.  Here are some tips for managing hazards the season brings.

Winter wellness.  Chilly weather can aggravate certain medical conditions such as arthritis.  If your dog hasn’t seen your veterinarian prior to winter, it’s important to make an appointment for an exam.  What’s more, as the American Veterinary Medical Association points out, dogs who are in top physical condition fare best facing winter weather.

Know your pooch.  Every dog is different, and just like people some mind the cold more than others.  There are physical factors that can affect how well your dog tolerates colder conditions, such as body fat stores and coat length.  Age and medical conditions can also weigh into your dog’s comfort during winter.  Bear all this in mind and make choices based on your dog’s personal comfort zone.  For example, dogs with shorter coats or who tend to get chilly benefit from a sweater or jacket when they go outside to potty. Continue reading