What Your Pet’s Sleeping Position Means

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Guest Post: Brigid Ludwig

Most pet owners have developed their own way of communicating with their pets. Your furry friend can often tell by the tone of your voice when you’re praising or reprimanding them, and you know by those big puppy dog eyes that they want a piece of the food you’re eating.

This communicating goes for body language as well. You can tell by a wagging tail or raised hackles that your pet is excited or unhappy. Likewise, they can often tell when you’re angry or upset based on how you move. Take some time to notice how often you’re reading your four-legged friend’s body language, and you may be surprised how clearly their personality comes through. So even if your pet can’t talk to you, there’s an unspoken bond that doesn’t need words.

But did you know that just like their waking body language, there are insights to be gained from how your pets sleep? There are many subtle cues to pay attention for that could reveal whether your furry friend is happy, cold, anxious, or comfortable. If you’re not checking out the signals they’re sending while asleep, you’re missing out on valuable insights into your pet’s state of mind.

For more insight into what your pet’s sleeping position means, Sleep Advisor compiled a list of your pet’s most common sleeping positions and what they mean. Check it out below:

What your pet's sleeping position means infographic

Is Your Dog Affecting Your Quality of Sleep – In a Good Way?

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Is dog in bed OK?

Photo by Andy Omvik on Unsplash

Contribution from freelance writer Sally Writes

For many dog lovers, as the snowflakes begin to fall and the temperatures outside reach gelid lows, few things appeal more than snuggling up to our beloved pooch, ‘naughtily’ allowing the little gremlin to burrow under the blanket on occasion. There seems to be plenty of conflicting information when it comes to allowing access to bedrooms for dogs; on the one hand, we know that having pets can actually help keep allergies at bay and boost children’s immunity. Pets also wield important benefits to our mental health. On other hand, it is not uncommon to read warnings about the ‘dangers’ of allowing our dogs to get too close.

What Science Says

Early studies (such as one Mayo Clinic study carried out in 2002) found that of 300 people surveyed, 60% had pets who slept in the bedroom; in the latter group, there was a 57% chance that the dog would sleep on the bed. The study found that 53% of participants had sleep disruptions caused by movement in the bed, pets snoring, and whimpering.

In 2012, the Mayo Clinic repeated this survey, finding that around 20% of those who slept with a pet in their bedroom or bed said their sleep was disturbed by their pets. However, 41% felt that their pets helped them sleep better.

The Mayo Clinic finally conducted their own study in 2017, tracking 40 participants via activity trackers. The findings were clear: while those who actually let the dog in the bed had less quality sleep, yet when dogs slept in the room (but not on the bed), their owners actually slept better! The conclusion is that there is no need to miss out on the treat of having your dog nearby. Continue reading