Dogs and Hardwood Floors – DogBlog

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Guest Post by: Aedan Kiernan
Digital Marketing Executive
Wood Finishes Direct
Folkestone, Kent, UK

For many home owners, who are also dog owners, hardwood flooring is but a dream. Dogs claws, vomit, urine and dirty paws are all things that can cause havoc to a hardwood floor. However this doesn’t mean hardwood floors are out of the picture. Providing you choose the right wood, finish, sheen and cleaning products, your dog and floor can coexist in relative harmony. Although there is no way to stop damage altogether, you can reduce and limit the damage.

Wood – Choosing the wood will be the first thing you do, and there are so many woods available, oak, pine, walnut, ash, cherry, maple, the list goes on, but which one is best. The key to choosing wood flooring for a home with dogs is finding one which is strong and light in colour. You want it to be strong so it stands up well to your dogs claws and light in colour so any damage is less visible. This sums up oak perfectly as it is one of the strongest woods available, is naturally light in colour, and it is affordable. Although you could try an aged or distressed looking wood so any damage look like it is intentional.

Finish – Now that you have chosen the wood, now the question looms, what finish should I choose? Your new hardwood floor needs a finish to protect it from dirt and wear, otherwise it will quickly become damaged and eventually ruined. There are two main finishes on the market for floors and these are oils and varnishes. Oils are very popular as they offer a natural look and feel, but they are not suited to standing up to the wear caused by dogs. For this reason a floor varnish is the best choice of finish to provide the resilience you need. A varnish offers a hard and durable protective coating on top of the wood, helping to prevent damage and protecting the wood. The great thing with a varnish is multiple layers can be built up to increase protection. Make sure you use a specific “floor varnish” as these are made for floors and have increased protection to other generic varnishes. You can find a range of floor varnishes at Wood Finishes Direct. Continue reading

Is your garden pet ready for summer

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Guest Blogger: Aedan Kiernan
Reflect Digital

Most dogs adore summer and see it is a fantastic opportunity to explore and run around in new places. There are several steps you can take to ensure your dog has a glorious healthy summer without becoming ill or having an accident. Some of the most important tips include keeping your dog hydrated at all times and preventing them becoming sunburnt. You may also wish to keep them away from toxic plants, lungworm and artificial grass. Let’s explore some of the best ways to get your pet ready for summer.

Thwarting sunburn

dog-summerSunburn can be just as harmful to pets as it is to humans. Too much sun can lead to skin cancer, and certain dogs are at significant risk of sunburn. These include white-furred, hairless, light-coloured and short-haired dogs. If your dog does become sunburn, you can apply natural treatments like aloe vera to the red or raw area. Make sure your dog has breaks from the hot sun and benefits from an adequate amount of shade. It’s essential that you don’t leave your dog out in the hot sun for too long.

Investing in artificial grass

Soil and natural grass tend to play host to a number of hazards including snails and slugs. Your dog can become affected by lungworm if he or she swallows a slug or snail so it’s a good idea to remove them from your garden as soon as you spot them. Some dog owners are now investing in installing artificial grass in order to avoid the lungworm problem. By using fake grass you can massively reduce the number of slugs and snails in the your garden in the first place. There are plenty of synthetic grass companies like Forever Green Lawns who supply and install artificial grass which is pet friendly.

Learn about toxic plants

It’s wise to know which plants do and don’t pose a threat to your dog. Obtaining a list of toxic plants will help you work out which plants you shouldn’t be keeping in your garden if you have a dog. If you don’t want to get rid of your plants you could consider making the area in question inaccessible to your dog. Some plants can be more hazardous than you might expect – apple seeds pose a significant risk.

Give them the water they need

Hydration is just as important for dogs as it is for humans. Dogs can become dehydrated frighteningly quickly, so always ensure there’s a good supply of water at home and when you’re out and about. Grooming is also important. Long hair can cause accidents and make your dog uncomfortable, so it’s wise to give them a trim as the temperatures rise. Claws can also become snagged and cause accidents. Regular brushing should help your dog remain comfortable. A dog tag with your contact details on will help if you become separated from your dog.

Do you need a dog kit?

It’s a good idea to invest in a pet kit for when you and your dog are on your travels. Kits tend to include everything you might need to keep your dog happy when you’re away from home, including food, bowls, treats and toys. Chilled gel packs placed under the collar will also keep your dog comfortable whether they’re playing in your garden or out walking. You can even invest in special jackets to keep dogs cool. Some dog owners have even purchased special boots for protection from hot sand, glass and many other hazards.

Planning exercise

Sudden bursts of activity can lead to pain, so if you do like to take your dog out for a long runabout at the weekend, make sure they also get ample exercise during the week. By taking note of a few simple instructions, you can give your dog the summer he or she deserves, prevent them from getting ill, becoming lost or being hurt in an accident.

Photo:  Copyright Julie Walton

Reason God Made Dogs

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Aren’t you thankful that God looked down on his wide eyed children and said “They need a companion” – so God Made A Dog.

God said I need somebody willing to wake up, give kisses, pee on a tree, sleep all day, wake up again, give more kisses, then stay up until midnight basking in the glow of a television set – so God made a Dog.

God said I need someone willing to sit .. then stay .. then roll over …

We are so thankful that God made Dogs! I’m sure he had a good reason to create cats too, but dog lovers see the wisdom of this wonderful gift – The Dog.

 

What Happens When Engineers Own Dogs

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We are not engineers here in the Walton household, but we do have a dog who would love this smart design. Belle loves to fetch a tennis ball, that is her favorite game. I was watching this video, laughing with glee, and Blue Belle noticed. She immediately brought me a ball.

Enjoy the funny video
“What Happens When Engineers Own Dogs”

Pawsitive Works – Youths Team Up With Canines

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Website: pawsitiveworks.com

Find them on Facebook – Let’s help them increase their followers

What an inspiration! Julie and Maggie, Idaho Dog Bloggers have been in touch with Pawsitive Works and are happy to hear this program for youth at risk and shelter dogs will be expanding to our local Treasure Valley to serve the Canyon County Community. They will be using shelter dogs from the Caldwell Shelter and youth referred by juvenile probation. According to Karen Schumacher, Pawsitive Works Executive Director, it is a a life changing program for the youth and dogs. Pawsitive Works will be expanding to Caldwell in the Fall of 2012 and are in need of volunteers who want to make a difference in the lives of youth and shelter dogs. So let’s get excited Idaho dog lovers. Send them your support. You are encouraged to connect with Pawsitive Works on Facebook and visit their website volunteer page. We know how much volunteer spirit we have here in Idaho, so here’s your chance to get involved.

Pawsitive Works

About the Pawsitive Works Program

Pawsitive Works is making a measurable difference in the lives of at risk youth.

Our program provides at risk youth with behavior skills that are linked to increased school attendance, improved community relations and decreased problem behaviors.  The program increases self-concept and mindfulness and positively affects empathy through the care and training of homeless behaviorally challenged dogs. Continue reading